Teachers' notes page

This resource enables children to explore what the Leeds West Indian Carnival looks like, what it celebrates, and why it is significant to the local area of Chapeltown in Leeds as well as to the wider Leeds community and beyond.

 

There is also information on other carnivals and festivals held in and around the city of Leeds.  


Curriculum Links:

KS2  History – Black History; Local Study (study of an aspect of history dating from a period beyond 1066 that is significant to the locality); 


Literacy, ICT,  KS1
History – Local Study (Significant historical events, people and places in the locality);  


Aims of resource:

This resource enables children to explore what the Leeds West Indian Carnival looks like, what it celebrates, and why it is significant to the local area of Chapeltown in Leeds as well as to the wider Leeds community and beyond.


Learning objectives:

  • Knowledge of the history of Carnival, specifically Leeds West Indian Carnival 
  • Understanding of the roots of the Carnival, and why it is significant to Leeds, Chronological Understanding
  • Skills – comparing and contrasting, researching, creating a timeline, creating a quiz, invitation writing

Discussion ideas:

  • What words come to mind when you think of ‘Carnival’? 
  • How do you think the Leeds West Indian Carnival might be different from other carnivals? 
  • Why is it important that the Leeds West Indian Carnival is celebrated every year? 
  • How has your understanding of what Carnival means changed since learning about the Leeds West Indian Carnival? 

Activity ideas (for 'Audio' clips please see links below):

  • Listen to Claude Hendrickson  (one of the organisers of events) at the Fortieth Leeds West Indian Carnival talk about the meaning of Carnival (from 00.44 – 1.36), and decide on three reasons why Carnival is important. 
  • Listen to the audio clip where Shackeen from Hillcrest Primary School tells us a little about J'ouvert morning. Imagine you are a journalist interviewing Shackeen. Write down a list of questions that you might ask him.  
  • Listen to Khadjah talk about where the traditions around Carnival come from (from 00.00 - 00.47). For more information on the West Indian Slave trade, see  'Related Links' at the bottom of the page).
  • Look at The Schoolrun website (  see 'Related Links' below  ) for a short timeline on the slave trade, and see if you can create a new timeline for the Leeds West Indian Carnival.
  • Create a 5-question quiz for someone else, based on the information on the fact sheet
  • Write a letter of invitation to someone (a child who lives in another city perhaps), persuading them to come to Carnival. You’ll need to include when it will be held, where, who it is run by, why it is important, and the reasons why they should come along!

Acknowledgements:


With massive thanks to Susan Pitter and the Carnival organising committee, Artemis, Leodis, Leeds Libraries and West Yorkshire Archive Service.
Colourful costumes at Leeds West Indian Carnival, August 1997
Colourful costumes at Leeds West Indian Carnival
Colourful costumes at Leeds West Indian Carnival